Long Island Home Pet Euthanasia

Serving Long Island, Brooklyn, Queens, & Staten Island

(877) 219-4811

  • Cost is $450-$850 depending on body care (home burial vs. cremation)
  • Optional Clay Paw Print and/or Fur Clipping by Request FREE
  • $450 includes mobile vet drive time, house call time, sedation, home euthanasia (You may prefer home burial or a pet cemetery.)
  • $650 includes mobile vet drive time, house call time, sedation, home euthanasia, pet body transport, group cremation, nothing saved, nothing returned (You may prefer to have the mobile vet take your pet’s body and save precious photos instead of ashes.)
  • $850 includes mobile vet drive time, house call time, sedation, home euthanasia, pet body transport, private cremation, ashes saved, ashes returned via personal delivery or shipping (You may prefer to have the mobile vet take your pet’s body and save/return the ashes.)

Call Pet Loss At Home Long Island

877-219-4811 

  • Have your zip code ready (for example 11510)
  • Dr. Donna O’Leary is here to help.
  • She services Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and ALL of Long Island

Email

How To Prepare For A Home Visit With Pet Loss At Home:

  • A home visit usually lasts 60 minutes.
  • Please set aside a box of Kleenex for tears, a food distraction for dogs (ice cream, chicken, ham, cheese, peanut butter), two large bath towels that can get peed on and a very large blanket or bed sheet that the vet can keep. Please arrange for 1-2 family members or friends or neighbors to help lift the dog stretcher out to the padded bed in the vet’s vehicle.
  • Signature and payment are handled first. Cash or check (made out to the mobile vet’s name) are preferred. Credit card available with free processing.
  • The goodbye setting can involve friends, family, neighbors, Skype, FaceTime, other pets, candles, quiet music, dim lighting, flowers, photos, telling stories, sharing fond memories, kleenex and towels/soft blankets/pillows. Most home visits take place inside the home on the floor, couch, or bed or in the yard on blankets. Meeting at a beach or park is an option.
  • The most painLESS euthanasia method requires sedation first using the smallest needle possible in the most comfortable under the skin location. Don’t ever let your pet be catheterized or euthanized without sedation first. Sedation completely eliminates and avoids a painful vein failure nightmare.
  • The euthanasia process works as a massive anesthesia overdose and is started with a sedative injection. Most pets hold still for this administration, some squirm a little, some vocalize from the pressure of liquid going under the skin. A food distraction can work very well here for some dogs (ice cream, chicken, ham, cheese, peanut butter) and even cats (milk, tuna). If you are worried about your pet’s sensitive personality, chronic pain overload or unstable failing medical condition, the vet can discuss that with you.
  • Once your pet is unconscious and under anesthesia, then a back leg vein is used for the final overdose. Accomplishing unconscious anesthesia first guarantees that your pet will not feel or experience or know about any painful vein issue. Please be aware that open eyes and quicker breathing are normal to see at death.
  • Please request a clay paw print and/or fur clipping if desired. Those keepsakes are free and optional.
  • You can keep your pet’s body at home with you or the vet can take the body and arrange for cremation service. The vet’s vehicle has a large padded bed in the back and comes equipped with a stretcher. Please arrange for 2 – 4 family members or friends or neighbors to help lift the stretcher. There are two options for cremation: group/no ashes saved OR private/yes ashes saved/returned to you via personal delivery or shipping. Return usually takes 1-2 weeks. Rush cremation/return can be arranged. You can also attend/view the cremation.
  • There are issues to be aware of that are out of our control when it comes to working with elderly animals that are riddled with failing body parts. Cats are often more difficult to work with by nature than dogs. When it comes to the sedative injection, many cats are reactive and not the most cooperative by nature. Using the smallest needle possible in the most comfortable under the skin location is very helpful but not a guarantee that the sedation injection with go perfectly smoothly. Because every pet we are working with is overwhelmed with old age deterioration, debilitation, failure, and often cancer, it’s not uncommon to see some more dramatic body reactions while the failing body attempts to process the sedative drugs. For example, a seizure can occur when cancer has spread to the brain, muscle tensing or tremors or twitching can occur when blood salt levels are unbalanced, and quicker breathing or vomiting can occur as well. The vet’s explanations during the home visit will help prepare you for what is going to happen. It’s very important that we manage your expectations of what is medically realistic when working with a failing pet’s painful and debilitated body. Keep in mind, we are doing everything medically available to minimize pain and maximize peace by sedating first using the smallest needle possible in the most comfortable under the skin location. Most euthanasias are relaxed, quiet, peaceful fading. Some involve more dramatic body reactions because the body is in such unstable failure from old age and cancer.

Testimonial:

Long Island City, NY: The decision to put Lola, my 13 year old pug, to sleep was very painful for me. After she began to have seizures that couldn’t be explained, I knew that euthanasia was the most loving thing that I could do for her but he thought of taking her to the vet’s office filled me with dread. I was fortunate to find your website and was connected to Dr. Donna O’Leary. I would say that she was truly professional but that wouldn’t be enough. She was so kind, compassionate and understanding that I feel went beyond professionalism. She explained what would happen both procedurally and aftercare. After we spoke, I knew I had made the right decision and was able to tell Lola I could let her go. When Dr. O’Leary arrived, her professionalism and compassion continued. She was so gentle with Lola (who took to her immediately) and she explained what would happen each step of the way. I was able to hold Lola in my arms, at home, as she passed away. I was reminded of the day I brought her home and held her for the first time and it seemed fitting that we were together at the end. Aftercare was very well managed. I received her remains a day earlier than expected and there was a card included that had all of the details. I wasn’t expecting that and it was very comforting. Thank you again.

Long Island, NY:  It’s never easy saying goodbye to your pets; They’re family, and life is never the same when it’s time to say goodbye. Having Dr. O’Leary come to our home to make our Maggie spend her last moments in a place she felt safe and happy, surrounded by all who loved her was such a wonderful thing to be able to give her in her last moments. Thank you for everything!
-Patrick M. and Stephanie H.